Month: April 2012

On the way back…

On the way back to the condo we stopped off to be amazed at Ho’okipa Beach Park “perhaps the most renowned windsurfing site in the world.”

It was Awesome.

I got to hold…

I got to hold baby goats too.

The woman behind me is Rachel, wife of Ryan, and in charge of all the prepared items they make with the farm goods, and also she does the farmers markets.

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To the right of…

To the right of the scene above was another set of breaks used by board surfers, here finding their way along the shore to the kick-off point.

Sunset on day two…

Sunset on day two where I’ve walked four feet along the lanai to the right of last nights photos…

From their website: “Enjoy…

From their website: “Enjoy a guided visit to our unique family farm. Sample the cheese while we explain how it is made, from milking the goats to the finished product. Interact with our loving family of goats, free-range chickens, and check-out the honey bees.

“Next, take a stroll through our organic tropical orchards. Here you will see mango, papaya, avocado, lychee, citrus, breadfruit, and many other exotic fruit trees. Learn about our organic vegetable and herb gardens while you rest under the shade of a tamarind tree with colorful orchids hanging from the branches. Discover some simple ways we are making our farm sustainable.”

We got to hold…

We got to hold the chickens too. These are plain old farm (free range organic vegetarian) chickens not the Splendid Red Jungle Fowl that roam the island.

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The arrow points to…

April 18

The arrow points to our condo in Kihei. Lahaina is on the other side of the bay and we are on our way up up up 10,000 feet to the top of Haleakala National Park.

Once there the first…

Once there the first thing you see at the Ranger Station is this sign which asks “Why is it so cold and why can’t I breathe.”

This is a pretty…

This is a pretty good pano looking down from the comfort of the cozy Ranger Station into what everyone thinks is the crater mostly because the park service calls it a crater, but per Ms Wiki: “scientists believe that Haleakalâ’s “crater” was formed when the headwalls of two large erosional valleys merged at the summit of the volcano.” Ok.

We went out to…

April 6

We went out to the West Side today, to the town of Waimea where on Friday mornings the West Kauai Technology and Visitors Center offers a free lei making class.

We had two delightful teachers…

Looks to me like…

Looks to me like the same vantage point in the cozy Ranger Station at the top of Haleakala as the shot above but at sunrise that I snagged off the internet. We did not get there at sunrise. We got there at, oh, 11.

(internet)

We followed lei making…

We followed lei making by eating at a local place and I had to have the deLUX Loco Moco. Dark brown gravy poured over two fried eggs that are sitting on top of a slice of American cheese that sits on a hamburger patty all nestled in a bed of rice surrounded by sliced Portuguese sausage, mushrooms, and onions.

Fortunately I asked for a take away box right at the beginning before I scarfed the whole thing and ended up eating half of it for lunch and the other half for dinner.

Then we walked around…

Then we walked around the old western style town a little and over to the Waimea Pier, built in 1865 for the sugar trade. Now there’s a picnic table out there at the end.

Coming down 8,000 of…

Coming down 8,000 of the 10,000 feet we spent a little time in this town, Makawao, where we looked around in the stores, ate an excellent lunch at the Market Fresh Bisto, and…

Recalling their western past….

Recalling their western past.

The town of Waimea is very small and has maintained an ‘historic’ feel. It is also the last bit of gas/food/lodging available before heading up into Waimea Canyon. The Russian Fort is right outside town too.

Since we’ve both visited the Canyon and the Fort so many times we decided to move on in search of what we had not seen before.

What was once workers’…

What was once workers’ housing for the Waimea Sugar Plantation, we now have the ‘lovingly restored’ Aston Waimea Plantation Cottages. They really are handsome with period furnishings and those great front porches and not so expensive that you might consider staying for a few of your days on Kaiau.

Then Home Sweet Home…

Then Home Sweet Home away from home, the Koa Lagoon. .Condos for purchase and for rent on the beach at Kihei. We’re very happy here in our two bedroom accommodation with all the amenities of home. Someone else’s home that is, not mine, my home would fit in this living room.

Splendid Red Jungle Fowl!…

Splendid Red Jungle Fowl! We saw so few last year we were wondering if there had been a plague but this year there are plenty of them again strutting around in all their splendidness.

“How you eat a local chicken: You put a chicken and a rock in a pot with water and boil the water until the rock is soft. Then you throw away the chicken and eat the rock.”

This morning we went…

April 7

This morning we went to the Farmers Market at the Community College in the Downtown area, hoping to find the goat people there, but no joy. Then we went to follow the South Shore Koloa Historic Trail and did find several of the spots noted.

Here we have “the oldest Catholic Church in Kauai, St. Raphael’s was founded in 1841, two years after Catholics were granted religious freedom in Hawaii after the French threatened Honolulu. Father Arsenius Walsh established the parish.”

There was a crew of parishioners dressing up the church for Easter tomorrow.

It was a delightful…

It was a delightful little spot.

One of their highlights is that everything they display (fish…coral..everything) they have found locally and displayed under strict local governance of what you can have in captivity.

As we were driving…

As we were driving to our next destination I said to Sharon “you know, I feel like some Asian cuisine”. Really, I said “Asian cuisine” and then we turned the corner and there, set back into an industrial parking lot was this place so we had to go in.

It was like it looks, not great but I liked it anyway.

…it started raining and…

…it started raining and didn’t really let up so we ate lunch at the Grand Hyatt, did a little shopping, and went home to cook some of the food we bought at the Farmers Market, and enjoy a gin and tonic on the lanai.

Egret!…

Egret!

We see hundreds of egrets by the side of the road and in every field but they are always on the move. This guy was sitting quietly on top of a hedge in a parking lot watching for bugs.

…the sugar mill. …

…the sugar mill. Much of the history of 1830s Hawaii until tourism took over in the 1950s is tied up in the history of the cane sugar industry here.

Maui is the only Hawaiian island that still supports a viable sugar company and rumor is that they might not hang on for very much longer. This is one of two Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Company’s mills on Maui.

One of my Botswana safari companions was a sugar commodities trader and now I wish I had talked to him more about sugar!

Then we drove on…

Then we drove on into ‘Iao Valley.

What this says: “Commonly called ‘Iao Needle, the traditional Hawaiian name for this 2,250 foot high peak is Kuka’emoku. This peak is known as the phallic stone of Kanaloa, Hawaiian god of the ocean.

“During periods of warfare, the peak was used as a lookout by warriors. It was here that some of the Maui warriors retreated from the forces of Kamehameha I during the Battle of Kepaniwai.”

We had an early…

We had an early walk at Lydgate, also on the East Side, but the rain was threatening so I didn’t carry the camera and … not a lick of rain.

So we set out our chairs for a picnic brunch and … rain. We finished eating in the truck.

Nice. We walked…

Nice. We walked a ways up there, but rain was threatening and we were done anyway so back…

We went for a…

We went for a drive and the rain stopped just in time for us to have a visit to the Kilauea Lighthouse…

It’s our last morning…

April 20

It’s our last morning to kick around Maui until our afternoon flight to Honolulu.

We took our time packing up, took our time choosing a place for lunch and ended up at a great restaurant, Flatbread, in the charming town of Paia.

And then we made…

And then we made ourselves an island feast and watched the rain from the cozy comfort of the screened in lanai.

YEAR CHANGE!…

YEAR CHANGE!

April 20-22, 2012

Arriving in the evening to enjoy the sunset from Trevor and Beth’s living room windows.

…and a view of…

…and a view of one very small slice of the sugar fields that cover the agricultural part of Maui. Bon voyage Maui, Aloha!

On the South Shore…

April 9

On the South Shore today, we took an excellent tour of the Grove Farm lead by this charming woman whose parents came to Hawaii from Japan in the early 1900s.

(the tour group kid)

Here’s another one, Diamond…

Here’s another one, Diamond Head to our left, Waikiki straight ahead, and downtown Honolulu to our right.

Beth had put together a delightful picnic dinner at the beach after which we visited for a while and then retired to my room despite that my sister (ok, the real grandmother here) thinks it’s her room. I understand that other people think it’s their room too. And I let them think that.

Here’s a short introduction…

Here’s a short introduction from their website:

“As the American Civil War was raging between the North and the South, young George Wilcox took a lease on a struggling farm located on the outskirts of Lihue, in what was then the Kingdom of Hawaii. The farm had been chopped out of a large grove of kukui trees and was therefore called Grove Farm.

“His vision combined with his education resulted in his ability to change this arid farm into a thriving sugar plantation. As the Civil War destroyed the agriculture in the South, it helped sugar become a successful venture in Hawaii. Sugar’s success was also favored by the Hawaiian monarchy as it was an additional source of income for its kingdom.”

The paragraphs above are…

The paragraphs above are directly from the website. As I recommended last year, Sarah Vowell’s Unfamiliar Fishes is a great history of the period assuming you have a fondness for Sarah Vowell’s style of course.

Cats cats cats at this place.

The front lanai at…

The front lanai at the Moana Surfrider on Waikiki where we will return for the hula show in the early evening, but first…

We ate a huge…

We ate a huge and scrumptious brunch at the New Otani Kaimana Beach Hotel and Hau Tree Lanai. We ate and then camped out at their restaurant making it (and their bathroom) home base for our snorkel outing at Waikiki.

Janice (Beth’s mom), Trevor, Caleb, Charis. Inset: me, Amy (T&B’s pal from law school), Beth. Christa was studying at the restaurant and Sharon took the picture.

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Our tour group gathered…

Our tour group gathered in the kitchen where a sweet as could be woman made us iced tea and cookies and told us about how over the years it all worked in the kitchen.

Speaking of which, this morning I had a Starbucks giant espresso frappuccino with nonfat milk and not too much sweet powder and it was good. Oh no, that’s not good. I rather wish it wasn’t as good as it was!.

Hail Hail the Gang’s…

April 10

Hail Hail the Gang’s All Here gathered for our annual pot luck feast extravaganza! We are missing Camus’s teenage son Koa who came later and Camus’s boyfriend Curt who is off island for work (everyone loooves Koa And Curt).

Seated: Kathy’s son Ryan and his fiancee of one day Cheyenne, Kenny, Camas. Standing: Bob, Sharon, Kathy, me having rushed over to get in the picture and forgetting to open my eyes and forgetting to focus the &%*## shot, and Sharon. (When they’re together we call them The Sharons.)

Kathy, in celebration of her 60th birthday wanted to hike the Kalalau Trail along the Na Pali coast…which she and Camus did last weekend. OMG…

…it took them 8…

…it took them 8 hours to hike in. This map doesn’t show the entire 11 miles but you can get the idea.

There were no misshaps along the way. Fortunately they had arranged for all their gear to be delivered to/from the campsite by boat so they didn’t have to haul it in backpacks.

They spent two nights camping with the hippies who have settled in permanently. On the third day it only took 6 hours to get out…and a Grand time was had by all! And then they took a nap.

Trevor and Amy met…

Trevor and Amy met us at the Surfrider and then Amy went to the airport to return home to D.C.. (Way fuzzy! Why? No idea.)

We went over to…

April 11

We went over to the West Side today to enjoy a tour at the Kauai Coffee Company. They have a museum, and a gift shop of course, and a self-guided stroll with many interesting markers along the way.

They also had a video playing with an extended story of the process from seedling to cup’a joe that was very good, and they had samples of two dozen coffees for your tasting pleasure.

We ate lunch in…

We ate lunch in Hanapepe at this ohana place and it was fun. Check out the menu. Aloha all the way.

We had many special…

We had many special times with the kids. We got to play cards with Charis, just us while everyone else was out.

When we arrived Charis was playing the piano sooo well. She’s coming with Lona and Hartley to Cynthia’s wedding so we’ll get to have more time for fun.

Caleb was assigned as…

Caleb was assigned as my personal guide and protector during our snorkel outing.

Trevor: ‘Caleb, you’re with Granty.’ Me: ‘Trevor, really, I’m fine.’ Trevor: ‘Caleb, you’re with Granty.’ I only put up one small fuss because actually it was nice, Caleb is a delightful guide and protector.

I asked Trevor (a very sporty and competitive guy) if there was any sport at which he could still beat Caleb. Trevor thought that perhaps in wrestling due to his 50 pound advantage but he wasn’t anxious to risk injury finding out.

…and Christa set aside…

…and Christa set aside a nice chunk of time out of her busy-24/7 life for a quiet visit.

In less than two weeks Christa, who got into every college she applied to, will be making her final choice.

It was fun!

Back to the North…

April 12

Back to the North Shore today to see the Waioli Church and Mission House in Hanalei. The church was under a termite tent but the church social hall was hosting a hula lesson for haole housewives.

All the music came from the one woman sitting in front singing with her ukulele. She was great.

Caleb and Charis were…

Caleb and Charis were playing in separate Lacrosse games on Sunday afternoon so before we left we were able to catch a few minutes of both games.

This is the field and that’s Diamond Head. Mighty nice! Aloha family and thanks for all your hospitality.

The Waioli Mission House…

The Waioli Mission House was open for touring. Check before you go as they are open short hours three days a week. Ring the bell and the caretaker, Roger, will come out from a cottage on the property and give you a tour.

This is part of the grounds…

…and this is the…

…and this is the house from the side and from the front. The parents of the man from Grove Farm were responsible for this Mission so it was fun to tie more of the story together.

(sp/pk)

We took a drive…

We took a drive down in the valley, traveling along beside the Hanalei River and through the taro fields.

…and we ended our…

…and we ended our day with a drive through some back roads. I was trying to get us to a viewpoint for the Kiluea Falls but one road was blocked by a gate to a huge private estate and another road was blocked by construction of what looked like it was going to be another huge private estate.

If I lived around this area I would not be happy that all the backroads to where I was used to going were being blocked. This must be a constant problem where private developments grow up in once wild areas.

The Pride of America!…

April 13

The Pride of America! We always know when she comes in and disgorges her load by the tour buses that range across the island looking for Aloha.

Looking in the opposite…

Looking in the opposite direction we see the lovely bay of the Marriott and Dukes as well as my favorite strip mall on Kalapaki Beach.

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